Inspiring people - The Hate Destroyer.

“The person who draws a one-meter swastika on a wall knows exactly what he is doing”

Irmela Schramm at the age of 65 took control of the racial and homophobic graffiti in the pro-Nazi areas of Suburban Berlin. Since which she has inspired The Hate Destroyer Campaign, is leading the way in anti-race workshops in Germany, and has hosted her own exhibition of her pro-social graffiti.

Antisocial behaviours are not limited to Berlin. A widespread problem is visible through the way racial and homophobic graffiti is shaping the urban landscape. In Britain alone, there were a total of 52,028 crimes in 2009, let alone those that were unrecorded.

The prevalence of racial ideology caused Irmela to arm herself with a scraper and spray can, covering, removing or changing the offending graffiti on her streets. For the past 25 years, she has single handled faced threats and indifference to continue her campaign. With the taggers writing direct intimidating messages including “Schramm, we will catch you” she was still not deterred.

More recently her work is documented by Vincenzo Caruso and Fabrizio Lussu, increasing her support and influencing others into action. The Hate Destroyer Campaign was created to enable others to follow others, record their own work and be inspired into action. The campaign now has a strong following on flickr and at their website thehatedestroyer.com.

Irmela has also felt the positive effects of her recent publicity. As well as leading workshops in schools to teach about the racial connections to the tags, she has also launched her first exhibition in Italy documenting her works titled Vernissage in Asti.

Through adversity, determination and rejection of the racial ideology of the few Irmela and other members of the new Hate destroyer campaign are adapting and changing the urban use of racial tagging for the better. Next time you pass a none descript covered graffiti you too can appreciate the pro social effects of the hate destroyers.

(Reblogged from fashiongonerogue)
The spike.
A powerful and iconic piece of fashion adornment. I for one love them, whether it is the power that they make the wearer feel or the instant sex appeal they bring. I found this little beaut on Asos, and singing in the style of Mounser and Pugh I snapped it up.
Mounser’s Spring/Summer 2011 line, in her own words, “focuses on a futuristic journey, one that many rock stars, drenched in glitter, might sing about. Titled “Neo Conquistador,” the collection follows a future-bound phoenix rising from the ashes of a catastrophic wave of destruction to a path of redemption and rebirth, creating a new world from the rubble.” 
Her description is not an understatement. Each piece is comprised of details that seem intentionally placed one by one — gold crosses mixed with feathers and silver spikes, colorful baubles and gold and silver chains, layered exotically with no fear.
Mounser says her influences stem from her love of 70s-era glam rock and the fashion that came with it, and it’s easily recognized in her pieces. Post-modern space-age glam, one of these pieces could make your entire outfit stand out, could BE your outfit. Mounser’s “Neo Conquistador” collection screams futuristic fashion mated with Machiavellian overtones that evoke a visual mash-up of “Liquid Sky” and  Werner Herzog’s “Aguirre.”
Quickly becoming a rising star, Mounser is definitely a designer to keep your eye out for. With only four seasons under her belt, she’s made almost every major magazine cover, and has created pieces for several runway shows.
Quirky, relevant and excessive, Mounser’s epiphanies of glam are devastating and fantastic, a must-have to compliment any wardrobe.
              

The spike.

A powerful and iconic piece of fashion adornment. I for one love them, whether it is the power that they make the wearer feel or the instant sex appeal they bring. I found this little beaut on Asos, and singing in the style of Mounser and Pugh I snapped it up.

Mounser’s Spring/Summer 2011 line, in her own words, “focuses on a futuristic journey, one that many rock stars, drenched in glitter, might sing about. Titled “Neo Conquistador,” the collection follows a future-bound phoenix rising from the ashes of a catastrophic wave of destruction to a path of redemption and rebirth, creating a new world from the rubble.” 

Her description is not an understatement. Each piece is comprised of details that seem intentionally placed one by one — gold crosses mixed with feathers and silver spikes, colorful baubles and gold and silver chains, layered exotically with no fear.

Mounser says her influences stem from her love of 70s-era glam rock and the fashion that came with it, and it’s easily recognized in her pieces. Post-modern space-age glam, one of these pieces could make your entire outfit stand out, could BE your outfit. Mounser’s “Neo Conquistador” collection screams futuristic fashion mated with Machiavellian overtones that evoke a visual mash-up of “Liquid Sky” and  Werner Herzog’s “Aguirre.”

Quickly becoming a rising star, Mounser is definitely a designer to keep your eye out for. With only four seasons under her belt, she’s made almost every major magazine cover, and has created pieces for several runway shows.

Quirky, relevant and excessive, Mounser’s epiphanies of glam are devastating and fantastic, a must-have to compliment any wardrobe.

              

Interview: JR. 28 millimeters project.

The photographer-activist, JR, converts his pictures into posters and transforms our streets into universal open-air galleries. From Los Angeles to Berlin, he keeps his independence and illegal exhibits in the streets, which he considers to be his very own gallery. 

After his first guerrilla exhibition on the walls of Montfermeil’s ghetto’s (93/370) in 2004, JR settled down right in the heart of the district collaborating with Ladj Ly, inhabitant of the ghetto, actor and director from the collective, Kourtrajmé. 

Armed with a 28 mm lens, JR shot full frame portraits of young people from this neighborhood and the nearby district of The Forestière (Clichy-sous-Bois, 93). This no frills, straightforward technique allowed them to get very close to this generation.

Interviewing them, without restrictions, on the recent events of November 2005.  The first portraits were illegally pasted on the east walls of Paris, a district that was once run-down, but has now become a residency for the bourgeois bohemian, who are shielded from the flames. 

With abruptness, they provoke passers-by and question the social and media representation of a generation that people only want to see outside the doors of Paris or on the news.  The Book 28mm - portrait of a generation, is a collection of the 28 most meaningful portraits from the whole series.

Also included are some on the spot shots of moments shared with the young people of The Forestière, as well as several actions shots from the streets in 2005.

Truly inspiring.

Tea for one.

Design for Art Below, London.

  • Collaboration architecture, what is your opinion? Creative agility or remix fopar?

Aptly named Orgasm from SuperSuper Magazine… loving the camo/dramatics effects. Every boy should look this good.

(Reblogged from thecuttingclass)
(Reblogged from superfluousqueen)

Gareth Pugh. Fashion futurist and god.

Absoulutely love everything that this fashion guru creates, from studs, metallic finishes, dramatic edges and most importantly the bold uses of leather he really does push the boundaries that define modern fashion.

Taking on gothic, furturistc looks it is one that I definitely follow. I have even bought a cat suit and studs to recreate some of his style for my own!